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's to u.s. lawmakers: avert the fiscal cliff, or risk a credit downgrade. >> tom: i'm tom hudson. we're going global with legendary investor mark mobius, franklin templeton's top strategist on the state of emerging markets now. >> susie: and picture this: the u.s. is just a few years away from being the world's top oil producer, and self-sufficient. we'll tell you who's making that prediction, and investment strategies for your portfolio. >> tom: that and more tonight on "n.b.r."! >> susie: the u.s.'s top-notch credit rating is at risk. that's the warning today from moody's investor's service. the ratings agency told u.s. lawmakers that when it comes to the fiscal cliff, the time to act is now, not next year. moody's said if action on averting the cliff is delayed until 2013, it might downgrade the stellar credit rating on u.s. debt. right now moody's has a negative outlook on the u.s. economy. worries about a fiscal freefall, kept wall street stocks in check: the dow and nasdaq fell a fraction, while the s&p was up a fraction. american businesses are not only concerned about the fis
to major corporations. what can we do for you? >> it has been a truly momentous week. first, the u.s. election. the confirmation the chinese elite will steer china through the next decade. >> china will develop its own type of democracy, whether the west except it or not. >> we speak to henry kissinger in his first television interview since president obama was reelected. >> i think that both obama and xi jinping will have to acts themselves how they expect the relationship to of golf. >> with social media websites going in and out of fashion, we asked the founder of tumblr makes this different. >> it is a delightful surprise when you bumped to a stranger who cares about the same stuff that you do. >> the leadership of the world's second-largest economy is being replaced according to plan. the incoming president will come under increasing internal and external pressure. as hu jintao hangs over to -- hands over to xi jinping, demand for social change, health care, pensions grow louder. hu jintao has said there will be no western-style democracy but how much will the media fuel the con
and led to the worst oil spill in u.s. history. in its guilty plea, b.p. said it deeply regrets the loss of life and almost five million barrels of oil that into the gulf. darren gersh reports. >> reporter: justice department officials hope today's settlement and criminal pleas will bring justice to the families of the men who died when the "deepwater horizon" exploded. >> perhaps the greatest tragedy is that the deaths of the 11 men on board the "deepwater horizon" could have been avoided. the explosion of the rig was a disaster that resulted from b.p.'s culture of privileging profit over prudence. >> reporter: b.p. has agreed to plead guilty to 11 counts of felony manslaughter and one felony count of lying to congress. in addition, two b.p. supervisors on the deepwater rig have been charged with 23 counts of manslaughter. another b.p. executive was charged with lying to congress. b.p. will also pay a record- setting $4 billion in criminal fines and penalties. thrown in with the criminal charges is a civil settlement with the securities and exchange commission. b.p. will pay more than h
a massive oil spill at daily inched the u.s. coast. --deluged the u.s. coast. welcome to our viewers on public television in america and around the globe. there are real concerns that the conflict between palestinian militants in gaza and israel could spark a wider conflict in the region. air raid fire sounded in the israeli city of tel aviv as rockets were fired towards it. the assaults underlines the rising tension. >> tonight, sirens sounding across tel aviv. the commercial capital and most populous city now a target for the rockets being fired by militants -- militants in gaza. people to cover bread they could. there were no casualties -- people took cover where they could. there were no casualties. >> i saw a flash of light. 2 kilometers in the direction of the seat. the rocket landed in the seat. >> targeting tel aviv marks a significant escalation of this growing conflict. the body of the man held responsible by his it -- by israel for launching hundreds of rockets from gauze that. -- gaza. at his funeral in gaza city, the military commander was carried to the streets by a noi
viewers on public television in america and also around the globe. with just four days to go before the u.s. presidential election, a new jobs report is fueling arguments on the campaign trail. it seems to have something for everyone. president obama is time-outing that more jobs were -- touting that more jobs have been created than were expected. romney says the overall elm ploit rate is actually up. now starts the weekend blitz and the bbc's adam brooks has been watching the reaction for us. >> the voter in the state of ohio -- >> in 2008 we were in the middle of two wars and the worst economic crisis since the great depression. today our businesses have created nearly 5 1/2 million new jobs and this morning we learned the companies hired more workers in october than at any time in the last eight months. >> new jobs were created in america in october. 171,000 of them, many in health care, retail and business services. many more people returned to the workforce, possibly a sign of economic optimism. but still these are not numbers to excite a tired and skittish electorate. mitt romney, cam
. tom will be along later in the program. congress officially gets back to preventing the u.s. economy from falling off the fiscal cliff. while washington struggles on a fiscal cliff deal, what should you do about your portfolio? jeff applegate has some answers. he's chief investment officer at morgan stanley smith barney. and home depot hammers home strong gains and lays the foundation for a strong quarter ahead. that and more tonight on "n.b.r." it was another day of cliff- watching here on wall street today. investors and traders are waiting to hear what happens at an important white house meeting on friday between president obama and congressional leaders. they will be talking about ways to solve the so-called "fiscal cliff" dilemma. investors appear cautious about making any big moves until they know whether the cliff will trigger increases in capital gains and dividend taxes. the dow fell almost 59 points, the nasdaq lost 20, and the s&p was down five. meanwhile, in washington, congress returned to work for the first time since september. lawmakers face a long "to-do list," and g
charges and agrees to pay the largest single criminal fine in u.s. history. we examine the legal resolution of the gulf coast spill, two years later. >> suarez: science correspondent miles o'brien asks an age old question. why do we sleep? the answer comes from an unlikely underwater source. >> no, you don't need more sleep? you're getting plenty of sleep right? are you getting plenty of sleep? yes. >> brown: china's new leader will head both the communist party and the military. we assess the change at the top in beijing. >> suarez: and we close with the story of volunteers stepping up to help victims of hurricane sandy in the borough of queens in new york. >> there's people who have been without attention for a long time. some with, some without running water. definitely without power. you know, so as time goes, it gets worse. and i'm afraid if we don't like, really get this situation under control. >> brown: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: ♪ ♪ moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connect
talked to jimmy page about their special honor in the u.s. >>> welcome to our viewers on public television in america and around the globe. we begin with dramatic developments in the middle east. palestinian militants have fired a rocket all the way to jerusalem for the first time in decades. they have also targeted tel aviv. israel has risen but by calling up reserve troops and stepping up its bombardment of gaza. in a moment, a report from the gaza strip were there more civilian casualties today. first, we have this report from tel aviv. >> today, and the heart of israel, sirens scream for people to take cover from rocket fire. the past 24 hours have come as quite a shock. even for the million israelis living close to gaza, fear is part of their daily lives, the mortar and rocket fire have increased dramatically. one young couple went out to look at the rocket damage to their house and the warning of another attack sent them running. fire also interrupted a funeral of one of three israelis killed yesterday. premature babies had to be moved elsewhere. israelis are nervous. tele
captioning sponsored by macneil/lehrer productions >> ifill: general john allen, the top u.s. commander in afghanistan, is under investigation for sending messages to a woman linked to the scandal that forced c.i.a. director petraus to resign. good evening. i'm gwen ifill. >> brown: and i'm jeffrey brown. on the newshour tonight, we get the latest on what were termed "potentially inappropriate" e- mails and documents, and we examine if and when the white house and congress should have been alerted. >> ifill: then, the senate and the house of representatives get back to work. judy woodruff looks at the long list of challenges ahead. >> brown: one item on the agenda is the so-called fiscal cliff , and that was the focus of a white house meeting today with liberal leaders. we talk with two participants. >> ifill: plus, from "our food for nine billion" series, special correspondent mary kay magistad reports on china's moves to satisfy a growing demand for meat. it has transformed lives and diets over the past 30 years meat con suption per cap to has quadrupled and city dwellers e
of political solution? and what will the u.s. role be. >> i disagree with a lot of things that was said now. but one thing i very strongly agree. there is no political solution. and there can to the be a political solution because what you have in gaza is an organization dedicated it to the destruction of israel, dedicated to killing of jews. this is what they say openly. i mean this is not an interpretation of what they're saying. this is what they're saying. as long as the threat exists they will fight israel. they are committed to an anti-sellity-- anti-semitic of killing juice jews, it's in their charter n their document t is what they are openly saying. they are not leave israel alone regard will of what is happening. so once israel withdraws totally from the gaza strip they started shelling israeli cities. and i also agree that whatever israel can achieve, and it can achieve quite a lot. it achieved four years of tranquillity, relative tranquillity. but only can achieve relative tranquillity for a while and then it will come up again because the hamas is committed to the destruction o
that that will plunge the u.s. economy into recession and an unemployment rate back over 9%. >> i'm about in agreement with them. i think there are a few details i'm looking for. i look for the bush tax cuts to expire, the payroll tax holiday to expire, and that tow moo is a 3% cracks of the fiscal budget, and that would, indeed, push, in my analysis, push the u.s. back into recession. >> tom: what's the impact if we go over the cliff but are able to pull ourselves back, say, the first or second week in january. some are saying there are some odds of that happening. we could go over the cliff do see the threat but pull ourselves back. could there be damage done that's irreversible? >> there-- when you think about it, the fiscal cliff is sort of kind of a theoretical thing. the treasury, as we saw last year when we dealt with the debt ceiling crisis. the treasury has been groomed to adjusting so maybe the checks they can't write or the cuts they make might be later in the next few months. it gives them a little bit more time. the bush tax cuts, well, that would happen, but things could be grandfathered
days have been rough for the stock market. but, given those are the same eight days since the u.s. election, it doesn't take a genius to figure out what's put investors in a funk. it's all about what's happening 200 miles from wall street. negotiations between the white house and congress are holding equities hostage. >> we are right now pricing in the instability of policymaking. politics are very difficult to forecast. if you think markets are difficult to forecast, try forecasting politics. >> reporter: if discussions are at impasse, stocks sink as they have for the past several days. if progress on the fiscal cliff is constructive, the market gains ground. but, floor broker doreen mogavero thinks today's gain were technical. >> i think honestly people were covering shorts. i don't think it was very euphoric rally where people were saying oh good now we can move on. i think people were saying better not be short going into this weekend in case the come up with a template for a deal before thanksgiving. >> reporter: prior to the election, the s&p 500 was up an impressive 13% for
the election. u.s. businesses added 171,000 jobs in october across many industries. four days after sandy, the gas crunch in jersey, access to cash in the northeast and controversy nixes sunday's running of the new york city marathon. that and more tonight on "n.b.r.!" we begin with jobs. employers beefed up their payrolls last month, adding more jobs than expected as more americans counted themselves among the labor force. the official labor department count shows 171,000 jobs were created last month. that's much stronger than the 125,000 analysts were looking for. and the government revised its september new job count up to 148,000. thanks to more people looking for work, the unemployment rate rose slightly to 7.9%. darren gersh has the story from washington d.c. >> reporter: the october employment report makes it clear a jobs recovery is solidly underway. >> i think the key message there is that employment growth has been taken up a notch. over the last three months we've added over 170,000 jobs on average. that's a little bit better than what we've been seeing. that is enough over the
the cliff, it can be very bad for markets. >> what about the u.s. economy? dodge the congressional budgetary office says that if we go over in its entirety, $600 billion worth of tax increases and spending cuts, there is no doubt we will go into recession. if it is half a year or the entire year, it will depend on the rest of the world. europe is still in trouble, and emerging markets are slowing and that makes it all the more important washington get their act together. >> can the president pull anything out of the hat? >> he needs to pull something surprising. one of the things in the run-up to the election that was a case to be made for governor romney, investors thought he might be able to shop congress, surprised the situation back into alignment. the president has to bring both sides together and have talked going to an off site meeting somewhere and having a more bipartisan cabinet collected in order to bring unity. but he has to do something surprising. >> this is a self-inflicted wound, isn't it? >> absolutely. the compromises that we made to raise the debt ceiling over a year ago,
petraeus has agreed to give evidence behind closed doors about the killing in libya, including a u.s. ambassador. they want to know when they became aware this was a terror attack and not a spontaneous protests. some republicans are demanding watergate-style hearings. >> i am concerned about american lives in benghazi, the president not telling the truth about what happened there and what he knew and when he knew it, and that is why we need a special committee. >> i think it is important to find out what happened in benghazi, and i am happy to cooperate in any way congress wants. we will provide information we have, and we will continue to provide information. he did speak about climate change, big themes that are being drowned out. >> for more on the president's press conference, i spoke with hans nichols, the white house correspondent for bloomberg. >> the white house is insisting this is part of governing. this is a distraction for them. they do not necessarily want to answer questions about petraeus. use of the president going out of his way to embrace petraeus. it is not like th
decades and teaches at the u.s. naval academy. and sari horwitz is an investigative reporter at the "washington post." sari, we have watchedded shoes dropping on this all weekend. what new have we learned today? >> hi, gwen. we're now learning a little bit more about how this investigation started and more of what the f.b.i. found. i mean there have been a lot of questions of why does the f.b.i. do an investigation into harassing emails? i mean lots of people get harassing emails. i get harassing emails but what we found today was that this woman jo kelly who was a friend of the petraeus family, and she lived in tampa, she actually knew an f.b.i. agent and mentioned to him that in june she mentioned to him that she had been receiving these very sort of troubling, strange, bizarre accusatory emails. and gave them to him. he started the investigation. that's how it began in june. and... >> ifill: as we watch this time line unfold, sari, we can't help but ask who knew what when? for instance, we gather that the justice department, the f.b.i. knew about this some time ago. but th
to get this economy going. >> woodruff: we have two takes on the battle for the u.s. senate, beginning with the big money being spent in the most competitive races. we talk with npr's tamara keith. >> brown: and from arizona, we have the story of a former surgeon general challenging a six-term congressman for an open seat. >> woodruff: plus on the daily download, margaret warner looks at another way to reach out to voters with last minute messages on twitter. >> brown: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: ♪ ♪ moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> brown: the losses in life and property kept growing today, in the wake of "sandy". the death toll reached 92 and the focus on physical damage shifted to new jersey, where the monster storm blasted barrier islands and other
heats up. >> tom: that and more tonight on "n.b.r."! >> susie: the u.s. presidential election is just one day away, and that was the hot topic here on wall street. but investors were still cautious about making major moves ahead of the election, so stocks posted just modest gains, and trading volume was light. the dow rose 19 points, the nasdaq added 17, and the s&p up three points. but, where stocks go from here may depend on who wins the white house tomorrow night. suzanne pratt reports. >> reporter: wall street is hardly back to normal, with reminders of hurricane sandy still obvious everywhere. but, at least the presidential election could provide a distraction for those coping with the storm's aftermath. the question is will the stock market continue to distract in the days following tomorrow's big contest? that may depend on its outcome. like many on wall street, nyse trader jonathan corpina predicts a mitt romney win will be a big win for stock prices. >> i think when you see new regimes, new presidents come in to play in sort of a turmoil time, that change is always viewed as
. a u.s. army soldier accused of killing 16 afghan villagers in a drunken rampage in march is facing a preliminary hearing to determine if there is sufficient evidence for a court marshall. the sergeant is accused of leaving his base under cover of darkness and opening fire on civilians in at least two villages. several bombs have gone off in the bahraini capital killing two ex pat yot workers and killing a third. the blast was killed by five home-made devices. the state news agency described the explosions as acts of terrorism. you're watching "bbc world news america." still to come on tonight's program, fighting it out in florida. the u.s. presidential candidates pull out all the stops to win over this state. that's so pivotal with the voters. >> now to the chilling story of a pakistani man and woman arrested on suspicion of killing their teenage daughter with acid. the parents say they feared she would bring dishonor on the family. you may find the details in this report distressing. >> a mother and father in a joining cells. accused of dousing their teenage daughter in acid. her
and john mccain. they attacked her for saying the attack on the u.s. consulate in benghazi, libya, had been a spontaneous outburst of muslim anger when officials already knew it was a terrorist attack. and they insisted they'd oppose having her replace hillary clinton, who's stepping down as secretary of state. >> this is about the role she played around four dead americans when it seems to be that the story coming out of the administration-- and she's the point person-- is so disconnected from reality, i don't trust her. and the reason i don't trust her is because i think she knew better, and if she didn't know better, she shouldn't be the voice of america. >> reporter: in response, the president was vehement in his defense of ambassador rice. >> let me say specifically about susan rice, she has done exemplary work. she has represented the united states and our interests in the united nations with skill and professionalism and toughness and grace. as i've said before, she made an appearance at the request of the white house in which she gave her best understanding of the intelligence that
in need of a spark find one in october? u.s. employers across nearly all sectors were hiring, for a net gain of 171,000 new jobs. the labor department also revised its august and september figures higher, by 84,000. all told, it signaled slow but steady growth, and it was news that president obama wanted to play up in the campaign's final weekend, especially in one critical state. >> "oh (io), oh (io)" >> brown: the president made three stops in the buckeye state, starting in hilliard, just outside columbus. >> in 2008, we were in the middle of two wars and the worst economic crisis since the great depression. and today, our businesses have created nearly five and a half million new jobs. and this morning, we learned that companies hired more workers in october than at any time in the last eight months. ( applause ) >> brown: and the trend line seemed promising, as well. since july, the economy has added an average of 173,000 jobs per month, up from just 67,000 a month in the spring. at the same time, though, the unemployment rate ticked up a tenth of a point in october to 7.9% as more
. but first, the other news of the day. here's hari sreenivasan. >> sreenivasan: the u.s. supreme court announced today it will hear a constitutional challenge to parts of the voting rights act of 1965. the landmark law requires all or parts of 16 states with a history of racial discrimination to get federal approval for changes in election rules or districts. shelby county, alabama, has sued, contending there has been major progress over the years, and federal oversight is no longer needed. arguments are expected early next year. a jetblue pilot who disrupted a cross-country flight will be set free. a federal judge in texas decided today not to have clayton osbon committed to a psychiatric hospital. passengers had to restrain osbon last march, as his plane flew from new york to las vegas. they said he ran through the cabin yelling about jesus and al qaeda. osbon was charged with interfering with a flight crew, but was found not guilty by reason of insanity. he's been undergoing a mental evaluation ever since. as a condition of his release, he will not be allowed to fly or board any pla
much. that is an alarming prospect. as we reported, hurricane sandy has put the u.s. presidential campaign on pause, but today, it was back to business on the trail. republican mitt romney argued that he would do a better job leading the country's economy. at his first step in wisconsin, president obama appealed for another term in office to finish the job he started. a short time ago, he was given the backing of new york's mayor michael bloomberg, who endorsed the president's citing specifically the issue of climate change. i ask the political reporter for the "washington post" what he would be watching out for. we're entering the portion of the campaign where i start to the people who run for president just have a different team than the rest of us -- different gene than the rest of us. >> there is no doubt about that, but this is an incredibly close election at this point. a lot of people predicted this a year ago, that it would be close, and they've got the election they anticipated. a handful of states will decide if the candid -- will decide it. candidates will be in and out
will lead daily operations. >> susie: that and more tonight on nbr! >> tom: u.s. markets turned their attention back to the economy today; investors and traders liked what they heard. americans are feeling the most optimistic they have been in nearly five years about their finances and the outlook for the economy. the conference board's confidence index jumped to a reading of 72.2 last month. driving that gain, an improving job market. new claims for unemployment insurance fell by 9,000 in the past week to 363,000, showing modest improvement in the jobs picture. we'll have more on jobs in a moment. as for stocks, the dow gained 136 points, the nasdaq was up 42, the s&p adding 15. >> susie: but economists say that encouraging report on jobless claims and the confidence survey were collected before hurricane sandy. meanwhile, the effects of the monster storm are paralyzing much of new jersey and new york city here's an update: four and a half million people are still without power, and it could take another ten days before power is restored. limited flights have resumed at all of
jimmy carter, and editor of "u.s. news and world report," he's received both the national book award. you can read his blog at theatlantic.com. jim fallows, it's good to see you. >> thank you so much, bill. honor and pleasure to be here. >> what surprised you about this election? >> i guess what surprised me is, as the results sink in in the days after the election, how thorough going was the repudiation of what had seemed the unstoppable tea party momentum of the previous two years. and i think the fact also that in the days before the election, essentially, the right wing is saying, "yes, this is going to go our way again, as it did in 2010." i was in touch with lots of people in the romney campaign who really thought they were going to win and win big. it's been fascinating. there's been very little of the narrative from the right saying, "this was stolen, it was all fraud," et cetera, et cetera. and i think they may be sinking on them that they were out of touch with the actual nature of the u.s. now. >> you wrote the other day that the reelection of obama is actually more impres
and the winner in that state takes them all. he asked -- you have to try to get up to 270 total to win the u.s. presidential election. here are the totals so far. i will show you the order they were one in the last election. kentucky, louisiana, arkansas, alabama, utah, wyoming and so on. [no audio] we have a net -- how they look .t the next set of states pip texas has 38 electoral college votes. they are very significant. new jersey, michigan, oregon, washington, those are a bit more difficult to win, win than they did. this is how they progressed toward 270. the democrats are in the lead with a firm laid. -- a firm lead. colorado has been republican several times in the past. iowa, new hampshire, they might lose. minnesota, remember joe the plumber? the republicans campaigned in pennsylvania on died in 2008. -- on that in 2008. the democrats have won even more states in 2008. indiana could well go back to the republicans. florida fluctuates back-and- forth. i was always at the center of the fight. -- iowa is always at the center of the fight. what the republicans have to do is win the ones t
in the u.s. all over the world. this is a big global phenomenon. and it's now impossible to keep track of how every company and how people are using the internet. there's so much dynamism. that's what makes me optimistic that it's still at the very beginning. >> rose: and british actress keira knightley inhabits her latest tragic her win on anna karenina. >> doing pride & prejudice was frightening because that is the character people love some of and women want to be that anna is not that kind of a creature. she's a sort of very difficult jewel like creature but she's not somebody that people want to be. so from that kind of perspective it wasn't as terrifying as making on something like elizabeth bennett. but it was definitely challenging. she is a very odd one. >> rose: bezos and knightley when we continue. funding for charlry rose was provided by the following: captioning sponsored by rose communications from our studios in new york city, this is charlie rose. dns-- jeff bezos is here, the c.e.o. of amazon.com. he founded the company in 1994 out of his garage as an on-line bookselle
on september 11th that killed u.s. ambassador chris stevens and three other americans has led to a raft of sharp questions, accusations and recriminations. >> there were many days that passed before we knew whether we knew if this was a spontaneous demonstration or actually whether it was a terrorist attack. how could we not have known? >> i immediately made sure, number one, we did everything we could to secure those americans who were still in harm's way and most importantly, that we would go after those who killed americans and we would bring them to justice and that's exactly what we are going to do. >> but whether the president wins reelection, or governor romney takes the office, a dizzying array of broader challenges awaits overseas. romney says he'd restore a more assertive american role in the world. and the responsibility of the president to use america's greatest power to shape history not to lead from behind. >> the president says he's demonstrated strength and judgment. >> i said we'd go after al qaeda and bin laden, and we have. >> but the heated rhetoric doesn't offer muc
expert john challenger. he's in good company. the congressional budget office has warned if the u.s. economy goes over the fiscal cliff, unemployment next year will jump to over 9%. >> susie: hiring is also a big concern for the federal reserve. those worries could lead the central bank to extend its bond buying program to keep stimulating the economy. ruben ramirez reports from washington. >> reporter: the latest talk inside the fed is that its asset purchase plan appears to be working. fed policymakers say the strategy is helping financial markets, auto buying, and housing. that's why economist think the fed's buying spree continues into next year: >> a number of participants continue to expect that they are going to replace operation twist with straight asset purchases once operation twist expires in december. >> reporter: the fed has been buying back about $85 billion a month of long term bonds and mortgage backed securities. in minutes of its last meeting release today, fed officials, "generally agreed that a recovery in housing activity now appeared to be under way." but while
the cliff, so to speak. some economists are saying that means that the u.s. economy goes into recession. >> well, i think we would go into recession, we'd exacerbate our unemployment, underemployment problems, unless it was reversed very quickly. but what a lot of people haven't focused on is, you know, it takes 60 votes to get something through the senate unless you use something called budget reconciliation, which only requires a majority vote. under current rules you can only use that if you're making the deficit less, not more. so if you try to reverse a tax increase or you try to reverse a spending cut, you're not going to be able to do that unless you have 60 votes. and that's going to be tough. >> susie: all right, we have american voters in the polls now who are going to decide who's the next president. but from your point of view, which candidate has the best plans to solve this fiscal crisis, if at all? we have less than a minute. >> in all candor, susie, neither one of them have lay out a comprehensive and credible plan to solve this problem. i will, however, say that i think
and the developments that have suffered >> reporter: and the u.s. secretary of homeland security, janet napolitano, putting the housing issue at the top of her list as she toured damage in new jersey on sunday. >> the housing is really the number-one concern. we lost a lot of housing starts here in new jersey. and we don't even know yet which of the houses are repairable and which are irreparable losses >> reporter: getting fuel was an ongoing trial as well. long lines have become a fixture at service stations in new jersey where gas is being rationed and in new york where it's not. >> the cops told us to go down and turn around. we've been around the block five times. every time we come around it's a different cop telling us to go back the same way >> reporter: the lack of gas only added to the frustrations of some commuters today. >> i ran out of gas so i had to turn around and go home before i had to push my car home. with all the traffic and no trains running from brooklyn to manhattan, i couldn't get in >> reporter: still 90% of new york city's 1700 schools did manage to reopen today for the
spread further. now it is the actions of the top u.s. commander in afghanistan called into question. failing its mandate, the bbc gains access into an internal report showing the united nations failed to protect civilians in sri lanka. >> they left actually at the moment the population needed them more than ever. the government wanted them out of the way essentially because they didn't want anyone to see what was happening. >> running the world in just a week. a marathon man on a mission that boo leave most of us in the dust. welcome to our viewers on public television in america and around the globe. bizarre. it is the only way to describe the scandal that has already claimed the job of the c.i.a. director and now has america's top commander in afghanistan under investigation. both are strange enough, but how do you explain the addition of a shirtless f.b.i. agent and 30,000 e-mails. here is the latest. >> it is a washington drama with a stellar cast. the spy chief, the top general and two women who soon found themselves at the heart of american power. the lid came off the scandal
to protect citizens. the u.s. ambassador to the country said it was nonsense to say a small country could intimidate the u.n. workers and students in more than 20 countries across the european union took part in strikes to show their disgust at cuts and austerity measures. the largest protests were in mediterranean countries where the budget cuts will make their deepest impact. in spain, a more emotional issue. some people are being forced from their homes in a wave of defections. -- of evictions. we have this report from madrid. >> again they came, from the factories, the public sector, and their homes. some who marched were from the nearly 6 million unemployed. some were pensioners. this is the second general strike in spain this year. it wanted to protest against government austerity and to show their anger. here, in a suburb of madrid, the most extreme consequence, losing their home. inside this block, three generations, six people on the brink of being affected. the police came, the bailiffs are there, the protestors lard if you gather -- the protestors gathered. earlier this week, s
our cia director, the person who knows more secrets than anyone else in the u.s. government isn't in any way under a threat, under pressure from somebody else such that he would be vulnerable, you know, blackmail overstatements it. but what's he under, under duress in some way during the time he had this undisclosed relationship with a very willful person. i'm sure that that's the core of what they were looking at. and in a sense, david petraeus became free of that pressure and that compulsion in the moment that that was revealed. and so i think people have raised a question once that was done if he's not now in the military and there's not a uniform code of military justice issue, was it necessary for him to resign as cia director. jim clacker the director of national intelligence thought the answer was yes and i think that was for two reasons. first younger people at the cia are told if you get involved in anything compromising, if you have an affair have you to disclose and he and i didn't and with this event double standard. and the second argument was you may not be a gentl
celebrates the 25th anniversary of his first major victory of the u.s. nope 1987. i am pleased to have nick faldo at this table for the first time. welcome. let me go to one thing in your life. most of us are always enamored when somebody changes their swing. tiger has done it a number of times. you famously did it and took time off to do it. with david letterman -- (laughs) david lindbergh. >> no comedy, it wasn't a funny time. >> rose: why did you feel the necessary toy do that? >> i threw myself in some situations. i was leading the open championship, there were nine holes to go, i collapsed on that fell apart sort sort of thing. >> rose: why do you fall apart? >> well, that time if you cannot hit certain shots under pressure, that's the real bottom line or put under pressure. so i had a great year in 1983, i was european number one. then i went another year through '84 and i played with ben crenshaw in the final group at the masters in '84. i then won at hilton head, my first win in america. but to cut a long story short, by the end of the year a little voice said "you haven't quite got
. >> woodruff: and finally, the non-election news of this day. u.s. home prices rose 5% in september compared to a year ago, the latest sign of a housing recovery. the real estate data firm core- logic said the increase was the largest since july of 2006. and election day found wall street in a mood to buy. the dow jones industrial average gained 133 points to close above 13,245. the nasdaq rose 12 points to close under 3012. in iraq today, at least 33 people died in a suicide car bombing north of baghdad. nearly 60 others were wounded. the attacker blew up his vehicle near an iraqi military base in taji in the second attack to target troops there in 24 hours. most of the victims were iraqi soldiers. there was no immediate claim of responsibility. the classical composer and pulitzer prize winner elliott carter died monday, at his home in new york city. carter was known for his rhythmically complicated works, fusing american and european modernist traditions. the string quartets he composed have been called the most difficult every conceived. elliott carter was 103 years old. >> ifill: you can
that's at stake tonight. 33 u.s. senate seats, a third of the senate is up for grabs as well. 23 of those seats are currently held by democrats, 10 of them by republicans. in order to take control of the senate, the republicans need a net gain of three or four seats, depending on who wins the presidency. here is what the associated press is project the so far this evening. in the state of delaware, that tom carper has won reelection. >> ifill: and in the state of florida, bill nelson, who actually had been running against connie mack, the son and grandson of the famous connie mack, he has also won reelection, even though connie mack had been making a late surge. >> woodruff: both of those democrats. in the state of maryland, another return. this is senator ben cardin, returning for his second term. >> ifill: and in rhode island, sheldon whitehouse, a good friend of the president's, returning to the senate. >> woodruff: here we have a republican in the state of tennessee, bob corker re-elected to a second term. >> ifill: jeffrey brown will be watching the congressional races for u
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